Section Navigation


News Releases

 

CFC Awarded NIH Challenge Grant Funding from American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (September 30, 2009)

University of Oregon’s Child and Family Center (CFC) has been awarded a 2-year, $946,906 Challenge grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Funding for Challenge grants was provided earlier in the year by the Obama administration’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. NIH received more than 20,000 proposals addressing 15 Challenge topics relevant to specific areas of scientific and health research. CFC’s award is among approximately 200 that were funded.

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE RELEASE

 

CFC-ORI Collaboration Funded by Institute of Education Sciences (April 24, 2009)

University of Oregon’s Child and Family Center (CFC; Drs. Tom Dishion and Beth Stormshak) and the Oregon Research Institute (Drs. John Seeley and Keith Smolkowski) are recent recipients of a 5-year, $6,598,994 grant from the Institute of Education Sciences. Their collaborative study will involve 44 Oregon urban, suburban, and rural public middle schools and approximately 880 teachers, 13,200 students, and 3,300 parents.

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE RELEASE

 

CFC ANSRS Grant Awarded (December 10, 2008)
Self-Regulation, Attention Processes, and
Psychopathology in Children

The National Institutes of Health has granted University of Oregon research scientist Dr. Kristi Racer five years of career development funding to support a research program based at the UO Child and Family Center (CFC).

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE RELEASE

TOP OF PAGE

 

CFC Carbon Savers (October 20, 2008)

In November 2007, three women at the University of Oregon Child and Family Center challenged each other to see who could save the most carbon emissions from the atmosphere by not driving to and from work. Each woman set out to either walk, bike, or bus her way to the highest number. It wasn’t long before the idea of a contest gave way to a collaborative effort that would include other coworkers. The core group reasoned that the more workers who pitched in to help the environment, the better, whether each person had a competitive spirit or not.

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE RELEASE

TOP OF PAGE

 

Parenting Program for Low-Income Families
Reduces Toddlers' Problem Behavior
(September 16, 2008)

Low-income families who participated in a brief, tailored intervention program designed to improve parenting saw less problem behavior in their toddlers than did families who did not participate. That’s the finding of a new study published in the September/October 2008 issue of the journal Child Development. The research was conducted at the University of Oregon, University of Pittsburgh, Case Western Reserve University, Oxford University, and the University of Virginia.

The researchers studied 731 families who took part in the Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program in three geographically and culturally diverse U.S. communities. Half the families were randomly assigned to participate in an intervention called the Family Check-Up—a brief, motivational program that identified and encouraged positive parenting practices—and half received services as usual. The Family Check-Up is adapted and tailored to fit the individual circumstances of low-income families; in addition, it is less expensive than more traditional parenting interventions. The services a parent receives are based on the results of family assessments and focus on motivating change only in those parenting practices that are problematic and prognostic of future adjustment problems in the young children.

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE RELEASE

TOP OF PAGE

 

Centers for Disease Control Approves CFC Proposal (September 2008)

University of Oregon professor Beth Stormshak has been notified by the Centers for Disease Control that the Family Intervention to Prevent Child Maltreatment proposal will be funded for three years beginning in September 2008. Stormshak is the principal investigator for the project, which will bring close to $900,000 to the university’s research efforts.

The goal of the project is to test the implementation effectiveness of an ecologically based child and family intervention designed to reduce child and adolescent problem behavior and coercive family interactions, and prevent child maltreatment. The intervention, called the Family Check-Up, promotes healthy child development by enhancing effective parenting and reducing parenting strategies associated with violence and aggression. The Child and Family Center has refined the model by integrating findings from its developmental research and redesigning the model for community-based implementation.

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE RELEASE

TOP OF PAGE

 

National Institutes of Health To Fund Early Steps Project
For An Additional Five Years
(May 2008)

University of Oregon professor Tom Dishion has been notified by the National Institutes of Health that the Early Steps Project will be funded for an additional five years, beginning in May 2008. Early Steps is a collaborative program of research initiated in 2000 at three locations: Eugene, Oregon; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Charlottesville, Virginia. It has integrated developmental and intervention research in the design of a brief family-centered intervention to prevent problem behavior and early-onset substance abuse among high-risk families with toddlers. The 731 participating families enrolled in the program through the Women, Infants, and Children Nutritional Supplement Program (WIC). Results of the project include reduced problem behavior and emotional distress in children from ages 2 to 4 years and improved family management practices.

DOWNLOAD ENTIRE RELEASE

TOP OF PAGE