Section Navigation


CFC Scientists

Projects and Areas of Expertise

Allison CaruthersThe research interests of Allison Caruthers, Ph.D., center on adolescent gender and sexual socialization and their relationship to sexual behavior, sexual risk taking, and emotional well being in adolescence and adulthood. She is examining the distinction between normal, healthy sexual exploration and truly problematic behavior, as well as possible mechanisms by which CFC intervention services reduce risky sexual behavior.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

ChronisterThe research focus of Krista Chronister, Ph.D., is domestic violence prevention and community-based intervention, including women survivors’ economic and vocational development, community mental health interventions with ethnic minority and immigrant families experiencing domestic violence, and couple interventions for young adults at risk for domestic violence and substance use.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

Carrie ClarkCarrie Clark, Ph.D., conducts research on the development of self-regulation in young children. She examines the mechanisms that contribute to the development of important executive control skills such as working memory, inhibitory control, and cognitive flexibility. She is particularly interested in the implications of perinatal (e.g., preterm birth, prenatal substance exposure) and early sociofamilial adversity for children’s executive control development and on the implications of individual differences in executive control for children’s school readiness.
DOWNLOAD CV

 


DishionTom Dishion, Ph.D., founder of the Child and Family Center, conducts research in developmental psychopathology and intervention science. He was formerly a professor in the Departments of Psychology and School Psychology at the University of Oregon and is now on the faculty of Arizona State University. He is interested in understanding how children’s relationships with parents and peers influence the development of problem behavior in children and adolescents. His recent research interests include social neuroscience, with a particular focus on identifying neurocognitive mechanisms underlying self-regulation in interpersonal contexts. He is also interested in applying knowledge of developmental processes to the design of preventive and clinical interventions that reduce conflict and distress in families and improve child and adolescent social and emotional adjustment. He and colleagues are working on developing and testing an ecological approach to child and family mental health interventions in service delivery systems such as public schools.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

DonovickThe research and clinical endeavors of Melissa Donovick, Ph.D., are broadly centered on Latina/o mental health, parenting, and prevention science with Spanish-speaking Latina/o families and are aimed at improving child mental health outcomes. Her research agenda focuses on decreasing mental health disparities among Latinas/os by promoting culturally competent research, including developing, implementing, and evaluating culturally relevant preventive interventions for Latina/o families. and are aimed at improving child mental health outcomes. Dr. Donovick is an assistant professor in the counseling psychology program at the University of Oregon.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

GarbaczAndy Garbacz, Ph.D., is interested in promoting positive social behavior outcomes for children and adolescents by partnering families and educators to create sustainable systems of support across homes and schools. His research focuses on prevention and intervention within a tiered framework, conjoint (parent-teacher) consultation, and Positive Family Support. Andy is an assistant professor of school psychology at the University of Oregon. He is a licensed psychologist, licensed school psychologist, and nationally certified school psychologist.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

Hiatt-RacerKristina Hiatt Racer, Ph.D., is interested in individual differences in attention and emotion processing and how they interact with contextual factors such as parenting and peers to promote or prevent the development of psychopathology. She is using behavioral and event-related potential techniques to examine individual differences in the development of selective attention and reward/punishment sensitivity in children and adolescents.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

KhuranaThe core research focus of Atika Khurana, Ph.D., is on understanding the development of adolescent risk-taking behaviors from a prevention standpoint. Trained in an ecological systems framework, she examines the interplay of individual and environmental factors in relation to a wide range of adolescent problem behaviors, including substance use, risky sexual behaviors, academic disengagement, and mental health problems. Currently, she is exploring the role of executive cognitive abilities (e.g., working memory) and impulsivity in predicting adolescent risk-taking behaviors, with an emphasis on the role of families in the development of adolescent self-regulation.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

McIntyreLaura Lee McIntyre, Ph.D., is interested in early identification and treatment of childhood developmental and behavioral problems, with an emphasis on the multiple systems of care that support children (e.g., families, schools, healthcare). Within this broad framework, three specific lines of research emerge: (1) Parent training, education, and support; (2) transition to kindergarten; and (3) child risk factors and family well-being. She is especially interested in early intervention and prevention work with families who have young children with developmental problems who are at risk for negative social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes at home and at school. She is a professor in the School Psychology Program at the University of Oregon and a licensed psychologist, certified school psychologist, and board certified behavior analyst. DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

K. MooreKevin Moore, Ph.D., has focused his professional and scientific career on the development and implementation of evidence-based and evidence-informed behavior health treatments for children, youths, and families. He has extensive experience in researching, implementing, clinically supervising, and consulting on evidence-based treatments for externalizing and internalizing disorders across educational, community-based mental health, social welfare, residential, and juvenile justice settings. He is also interested in methodological and analytic techniques for the study of naturally occurring clinical events in the psychological and medical treatments of children and in the development and use of low response-cost clinical monitoring tools.
DOWNLOAD CV

 

 

SkowronElizabeth Skowron's research interests focus on clarifying the individual and joint contributions of neurobiology and environment to the development of children’s self-regulation.  She also studies the neurobiology of parenting at risk and family interventions to reduce child abuse and neglect.  Dr. Skowron and her research team use physiological, behavioral, and microanalytic coding techniques to model data streams in individual and dyadic family processes.  Her work has been funded by the NIMH and the Administration on Children, Youth and Families.  Dr. Skowron is an associate professor in the Counseling Psychology doctoral program and directs the College of Education’s new graduate specialization in prevention science.  She is also a licensed psychologist.
DOWNLOAD CV   

 

 

Beth StormshakBeth Stormshak, Ph.D., is the director of the Child and Family Center and since 1996 has been a faculty member in the University of Oregon College of Education’s Counseling Psychology program. Her early research focused on understanding developmental factors associated with conduct problem behavior, including parenting and peer relations. For the past several years, she has been conducting intervention and prevention research. Her work has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), the Department of Education (IES), and Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and her research focuses on delivering interventions in schools and relevant community agencies. Her focus is on developing and implementing family-centered, school-based interventions to reduce future risk of substance use and antisocial behavior. She currently is the principal investigator on Project Alliance 2, an NICHD-funded program to test the efficacy of the Family Check-Up model of intervention during the early adult years. She received a grant from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to develop a website for dissemination and implementation of the Family Check-Up. Dr. Stormshak also directs a training grant (T32) funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) that supports postdoctoral and predoctoral trainees at the Child and Family Center.
DOWNLOAD CV

TOP OF PAGE

Affiliate Scientists

Elliott Berkman, Ph.D. University of Oregon

Arin M. Connell, Ph.D.  Case Western Reserve University

Phil Fisher, Ph.D. Oregon Social Learning Center

Frances Gardner, Ph.D.  Oxford, United Kingdom

Beth Harn, Ph.D. University of Oregon

Jeff Kiesner, Ph.D.  Università di Padova, Italy 

Benedict T. McWhirter, Ph.D.  University of Oregon

Jennifer Pfeiffer, Ph.D. University of Oregon

François Poulin, Ph.D.  Université du Québec à Montréal   

Daniel Shaw, Ph.D.  University of Pittsburgh 

Melvin Wilson, Ph.D.  University of Virginia

TOP OF PAGE